Incidence of tuberculosis in England has hit a record low

  • Public Health England
  • 22 Mar 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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According to new data published by Public Health England (PHE), new cases of tuberculosis (TB) in England have dropped to the lowest levels since 1960. The figures come in the wake of World TB Day on 24 March.

The figures indicate a 44 per cent drop in new cases from 2011 (8280) to 2018 (4672). There was an 8.4 per cent decline in new diagnoses between 2017 and 2018 alone. The most deprived 10 per cent of the population have a TB rate which is >7 times higher than the least deprived 10 per cent. The TB rate is 13 times higher among individuals born outside the United Kingdom compared with those born in the United Kingdom.

PHE is relentlessly striving to achieve the World Health Organisation’s goal of lowering the global TB incidence by 50 per cent by 2025, and eventually eradicate the disease. PHE has also partnered with NHS England and other organisations to implement the 'Collaborative tuberculosis strategy for England: 2015 to 2020.' The campaign aims to raise awareness about the disease, tackle the condition in vulnerable populations, ensure successful competition of treatment regimens by patients, and reinforce surveillance of TB rates.

Dr. Sarah Anderson, Head of TB Strategy at Public Health England, said: "It is hugely encouraging to see a continued decline in TB cases in England, which shows that the interventions we are putting in place are having an impact."

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