Low vitamin D status at birth linked with elevated blood pressure in childhood


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Low vitamin D status from birth to early childhood may be linked with an increased risk of elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) in childhood and adolescence, according to a new research. 

Researchers followed a cohort of 775 children from birth up to age 18 years who were enrolled at the Boston Medical Center in the United States to investigate the effect of vitamin D trajectory through early life on SBP in childhood. Low vitamin D levels were defined as plasma 25(OH)D

The study found low vitamin D status in early childhood was linked with an around 60 per cent higher risk of elevated SBP between ages six and 18 years. Children who had persistently low levels of vitamin D through early childhood had double the risk of elevated SBP between ages three and 18 years.

Presenting the findings in the journal Hypertension, the authors said: "Screening for vitamin D levels during pregnancy or the first years of life should be recommended for pregnant women and their babies who are at a high risk, such as those with cardiometabolic risk conditions, so that they receive appropriate treatment and monitoring.”  

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