Lung cancer: more than 90% of tobacco users have tobacco use disorder

  • Paik SH & al.
  • PLoS One
  • 1 Jan 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • More than 90% of study patients with lung cancer who used tobacco in the year preceding their diagnosis also had tobacco use disorder (TUD); most cases were severe.

Why this matters

Study design

  • 200 patients with lung cancer who used tobacco within the year preceding diagnosis.
  • Funding: National Health Insurance Services, Republic of Korea.

Key results

  • 78.5% were diagnosed with nicotine dependence under DSM-IV criteria, 27.5% severe.
  • 92.0% were diagnosed with TUD under DSM-V criteria, 63.0% severe.
  • 73.0% had attempted quitting, 41.5% more than once.
  • 42.5% successfully quit within 3 months, and 30.5% in ≥3 months.
  • 30.0% had undergone smoking cessation treatment, including counseling, nicotine replacement therapy, and/or pharmacotherapy.
  • Patients with severe vs moderate TUD were less likely to have tried to quit >3 times (21.4% vs 63.2%; P=.009).
  • The number of satisfied DSM-V TUD criteria was associated with cumulative lifetime smoking amount (P=.001), cigarettes/day (P=.032), and Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence score (P=.001).

Limitations

  • Smoking amounts were self-reported.