Male breast cancer: what does the largest cohort study tell us?

  • Sarmiento S & al.
  • Breast Cancer Res Treat
  • 10 Feb 2020

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • This largest cohort study of male breast cancer (~16,500 male patients) showed that mastectomy is the most common therapy (90.4%) and is associated with the longest survival.
  • The analysis also showed that despite 91.3% of patients being estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, only 54.7% receive hormone therapy.

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest that hormone therapy is underused among male patients with breast cancer.
  • The incidence of male breast cancer is increasing.

Study design

  • Retrospective, population-based, national cohort (the US National Cancer Database) of 16,498 male patients with breast cancer (2004-2015).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Median age, 63 years; total follow-up time, 13 years.
  • Mastectomy was the most frequent treatment modality (90.4%).
  • 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival was 77.7% (95% CI, 76.9%-78.4%); 10-year survival was 60.7% (95% CI, 59.4%-62.0%).
  • According to Cox proportional hazards (adjusted for age, comorbidity, and tumor stage, among others), mastectomy was associated with the longest survival (HR, 0.49; P<.001 followed by hormone therapy p chemotherapy and radiation>
  • Although 91.3% of the cohort was ER+, only 54.7% of the cohort received hormone therapy.

Limitations

  • Hormone therapy may have been underreported.
  • Did not compare results to those of women in the database.
  • Observational, retrospective design.