Male circumcision reduces women's risk for cervical cancer, STIs

  • Morris BJ & al.
  • Front Public Health
  • 1 Jan 2019

  • curated by Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Male circumcision (MC) reduces women's risk for oncogenic HPV genotypes, cervical cancer, Trichomonas vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis, and possibly genital ulcer disease.

Why this matters

  • The reduction in risk for these sexually transmitted decisions (STIs) and cervical cancer affirms global efforts to deploy MC as a health-promoting and life-saving public health measure.

Study design

  • Researchers reviewed published reports of 82 observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) related to MC and female STIs.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • MC was associated with a reduced risk for female infection by oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and risk of contracting cervical cancer.
  • RCT data confirmed that partner MC reduces women's risk for oncogenic HPV as well as for T vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis, and possibly genital ulcer disease.
  • Evidence is mixed concerning the associations between MC and herpes simplex virus type 2, Chlamydia trachomatis, Treponema pallidum, HIV, and candidiasis.
  • MC did not reduce women’s risk for gonorrhea, Mycoplasma genitalium, dysuria, or vaginal discharge.

Limitations

  • Researchers found no RCT data related to MC's associations with women’s risk for HSV-2, trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, T pallidum, M genitalium, candida, and dysuria.

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