Meta-analysis: anxiety is common with MCI

  • J Affect Dis

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A meta-analysis finds that anxiety has a prevalence of 21% in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), although there is high heterogeneity across studies.

Why this matters

  • Anxiety is important to treat because it may confer a higher probability of progression to dementia.

Study design

  • Systematic review and meta-analysis included 39 studies (n=10,587) on anxiety in patients with mild cognitive impairment.
  • Funding: Hunan Provincial Innovation Foundation for Postgraduate.

Key results

  • Anxiety had a pooled prevalence of 21% (95% CI, 16.2-26.7) in patients with mild cognitive impairment.
  • The heterogeneity was significant (I2, 97.2%; P<.01>
  • After stratification of the sample, the prevalence of anxiety was:
    • Significantly lower in 21 community-based samples vs clinic-based samples from 18 studies (14.3% vs 31.2%; P<.01>
    • 21.8%, 46.6%, and 16.9% for informant-rated, self-reported, and clinician-administered sources of anxiety diagnosis, respectively.

Limitations

  • Individual anxiety disorders were not reported.
  • Inadequate data for stratified prevalence estimates.
  • Prevalence of anxiety may be underestimated.

Coauthored with Chitra Ravi, MPharm

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