Meta-analysis shows lower BMD in patients with CHF

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Takeaway

  • Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have a lower total bone mineral density (BMD) than patients without CHF.

Why this matters

  • Patients with CHF may be at increased risk for bone fracture, osteopenia, and osteoporosis.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 6 studies (n=552 with CHF; n=243 without CHF) that met eligibility criteria after search of PubMed, Web of Science, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure.
  • BMD was compared for total BMD and BMD in femoral neck, arm, leg, trunk, and lumbar spine.
  • Funding: Health Bureau of Zhejiang Province, China; Chinese Traditional Medicine, Science, and Technology Projects of Zhejiang Province.

Key results

  • Patients with CHF had lower total BMD than patients without CHF (standard mean deviation [SMD], −0.77; P=.000).
  • Patients with CHF had lower BMD in the femoral neck (SMD, −0.73; P=.000), arm (SMD, −0.74; P=.000), leg (SMD, −0.43; P=.000), and trunk (SMD, −0.87; P=.000), but not in the lumbar spine than patients without CHF.
  • Patients with CHF had lower vitamin D (SMD, −1.73; P=.028) and higher parathyroid hormone (SMD, 1.24; P=.000) than patients without CHF.

Limitations

  • Small number of studies, 2 of which were case reports.
  • Heterogeneity across studies.