Metastatic NSCLC: blood transfusion tied to earlier progression, shorter survival

  • Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Patients with metastatic NSCLC treated with first-line chemotherapy who received allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) before or during therapy had significantly worse outcomes than those who received no transfusion.
  • Effect was pronounced with adenocarcinoma histology.

Why this matters

  • Blood transfusions may cause immunosuppression and have been shown to negatively affect outcomes in some cancers, including early-stage lung cancer.

Study design

  • 433 patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving first-line chemotherapy received ABT before treatment (n=43), during treatment (n=87), or not at all (n=303).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Median PFS was significantly better with no-ABT than with ABT before or during treatment (7.0 vs 5.0 vs 4.0 months, respectively; P<.001>
  • Median OS was also significantly better with no-ABT than with ABT before or during treatment (14.0 vs 9.0 vs 7.0 months, respectively; P<.001>
  • In adenocarcinoma patients, median PFS and OS were better in patients with no-ABT than with ABT before or during treatment (8.0 vs 3.0 vs 3.0 months [P<.001 and vs months respectively>
  • Receiving ABT during treatment was associated with worse PFS (aHR, 1.506; P=.003) and worse OS (aHR, 1.369; P=.025).

Limitations

  • Retrospective, single-center study.

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