Multiple myeloma risk tied to larger body shape through age 60 years

  • Marinac CR, et al.
  • JNCI Cancer Spectr
  • 24 Jun 2019

  • curated by David Reilly
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Maintaining lean, stable body weight from early age throughout life was linked to reduced risk for multiple myeloma (MM).

Why this matters

  • Obesity is a known risk factor for MM; however, several aspects of this relationship have not been previously studied.

Study design

  • Study to investigate associations between 20-year weight patterns in adulthood, body shape through age 60 years, central/peripheral adiposity, and risk for MM.
  • Data were sourced from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) in patients with no cancer history.
  • Funding: National Institutes of Health; American Cancer Society; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Stand Up To Cancer Dream Team Research Grant.  

Key results

  • 582 cases of MM were identified in 4,280,712 person-years of follow-up.
  • Increased risk for MM in persons beginning with midrange body shape at age 5 years and getting larger through age 60 years vs persons maintaining a lean body shape throughout this period when adjusted for height (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.22-2.14).
  • Risk for MM was increased in persons with extreme cycling between weight gain/loss; however, this linkage was nonsignificant when adjusted for cumulative body mass index.

Limitations

  • Self-reported data for primary exposure variables.