Myeloid leukemias, CLL rising sharply in baby boomers

  • Hao T & al.
  • Sci Rep
  • 19 Aug 2019

  • curated by David Reilly
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Incidence rates for myeloid cancers and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have increased sharply among baby boomers, correlating strongly with population aging.

Why this matters

  • The entire baby boomer generation will be aged ≥65 years by 2030.
  • Incidences of myeloid leukemia and CLL significantly outpaced that of cancer overall.

Study design

  • Analysis of changes in cancer incidence in the United States, 1998-2018.
  • Data source: American Cancer Society.
  • Funding: National Institutes of Health; City of Hope Center for Cancer and Aging.

Key results

  • Population-adjusted incidences for leukemia in 1998 vs 2018 (cases/incidences per 100,000):
    • 19% increase in all-cancer incidence: 445.3 vs 531.1.
    • 78% increase in leukemia incidence: 10.4 vs 18.5.
  • Significant correlations between cancer incidence and population aging for years 1999 (when baby boomers began to turn 65 years) through 2011:
    • All cancers: Pearson r=0.90; P<.0001.>
    • CLL: Pearson r=0.77; P=.0022.
    • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: Pearson r=0.85; P=.0003.
  • Significant correlations between cancer incidence and population aging for years 2011-2018:
    • Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML): Pearson r=0.94; P=.0004.
    • Acute myeloid leukemia (AML): Pearson r=0.84; P=.0082.
    • CLL: Pearson r=0.84; P=.0094.

Limitations

  • Data source did not distinguish between therapy-related and de novo AML.