NASH tied to increased risk for advanced colorectal polyps

  • Cho Y & al.
  • Liver Int
  • 4 Jun 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Biopsy-proven nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is tied to an increased risk for advanced colorectal neoplasm in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Why this matters

  • Findings warrant screening for colorectal cancer in patients with NAFLD.

Study design

  • Study of 476 patients aged ≥18 years with clinically suspected NAFLD who underwent screening colonoscopy as part of a biopsy-evaluated prospective cohort.
  • Funding: Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center.

Key results

  • 379 patients (79.6%) had biopsy-determined NAFLD, including 194 patients with NASH; the remainder (n=97) had no evidence of NAFLD and comprised the "healthy controls" arm.
  • 11.1% had advanced colorectal neoplasm (mean number, 3.0±3.5), 21.0% had low-grade polyps (mean number, 3.1±2.2), and 67.9% showed no evidence of polyps.
  • Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasms had higher grades of steatosis (P=.004) and hepatic fibrosis (P=.044).
  • Advanced colorectal neoplasms were more common in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver (12%; P=.003) and NASH (13%; P=.05) than healthy controls (5%).
  • In multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, and diabetes, NASH (vs no NAFLD) was tied to increased risks for:
    • Colorectal polyp (OR=2.08; P=.020).
    • Advanced colorectal neoplasm (OR=2.81; P=.049).

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional design.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit