National Pregnancy in Diabetes audit report

  • Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership
  • 10 Oct 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership recently published the National Pregnancy in Diabetes (NPID) audit report for 2017 and 2018. The NPID audit periodically evaluates the quality of antenatal care and pregnancy outcomes for women with pre-gestational diabetes. Data for the audit are obtained from antenatal diabetes services in England, Wales and the Isle of Man.

Key findings from the audit report are as follows:

  • In 2018, more than half of the women from England and Wales included in the audit had type 2 diabetes (T2D).
  • Seven out of eight women with diabetes are not adequately prepared for pregnancy.
  • Majority of the women with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and just over half of women with T2D are seen within 10 weeks of gestation.
  • There was an increase in the rate of admissions for hypoglycaemia in women with T1D.
  • The number of neonatal unit admissions is higher for babies born to women with diabetes, especially those born between 34 and 37 weeks. Full-term babies born to mothers with T1D have a higher likelihood of admission to neonatal units than those born to mothers with T2D.
  • The rates of anomalies, stillbirths and neonatal deaths were higher in the diabetic population (98.6% live births) than in the non-diabetic population (99.6% live births).
  • In 2018, stillbirth rates in the audit were 13.7 per 1000 total births and neonatal death rates were 10.4 per 1000 live births across all diabetes types.