New figures on antimicrobial resistance in Europe


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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New data from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) should ring alarm bells regarding antimicrobial resistance, says Vytenis Andriukaitis, European Union (EU) Commissioner for Health and Food Safety.

The commissioner was commenting on the latest EU summary report on antimicrobial resistance, which presents data collected from 28 Member States for the year 2017.

The report shows a high proportion of human Salmonella isolates were resistant to ampicillin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. Varying rates of presumptive extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC producers in Salmonella were observed between countries. Low levels of colistin resistance were also observed.

Although combined resistance to critically important antimicrobials was generally uncommon, very high to extremely high multi-drug resistance was observed in S. typhimurium. S. kentucky from humans exhibited high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin in addition to a high prevalence of ESBL resistance.

In Campylobacter, high to extremely high proportions of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and tetracyclines, particularly in Campylobacter coli. In five countries, high to very high proportions of C. coli from humans were also resistant to erythromycin.

Mr Andriukaitis said the report “should ring - again - alarm bells.” He called for action "before the alarm bells become a deafening siren."

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