New PHE statistics show improving cancer survival rates

  • Public Health England
  • 30 Oct 2020

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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Public Health England (PHE) has published new statistics which show improved survival in most cancers.

The latest figures show that five-year age-standardised net survival for all stages combined range from 6.7 per cent for mesothelioma in males to 94.5 per cent for melanoma in females.

In England, one-year survival improved between 2006 to 2010 and 2014 to 2018 for all cancers and both sexes except for bladder cancer. The largest improvement was 1.4 per cent on average per year for lung cancer in females.

Melanoma had the highest one-year age-standardised net survival in both males (97.6%) and females (98.8%) and for five-year survival in males (90.1%) and females (94.5%) for diagnoses between 2014 and 2018.

Pancreatic cancer had the lowest one-year age-standardised net survival in males (25.3%) and females (26.6%), and five-year survival in females (8.2%) for those diagnosed between 2014 and 2018. For males, the lowest five-year survival was in mesothelioma cancer (6.7%).

Childhood cancer survival has also continued to improve, with the five-year survival seeing the greatest improvement over time; an increase of 7.4 percentage points, from 77.2 per cent in 2001 to 84.6 per cent predicted for children diagnosed in 2019.