Nosocomial COVID-19 is tied to higher mortality in patients with cancer

  • AACR

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Hospitalized cancer patients with nosocomial COVID-19 have higher mortality rates than those with community-acquired COVID-19.

Why this matters

  • The findings emphasize that patients with cancer should be treated in COVID-19-free zones.

Study design

  • The study included 250 adults and 3 children with COVID-19 and cancer.
  • 81% of patients had community-acquired COVID-19 and 19% had nosocomial COVID-19.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • At a median follow-up of 23 days, the overall mortality rate was 28%.
  • The all-cause mortality rate in patients with nosocomial COVID-19 was significantly higher than in patients with community-acquired COVID-19 (47% vs 23%).
  • The median OS was 27 days in the nosocomial group vs 71 days in the community-acquired group (HR, 2.2; P=.002).
  • No significant differences were seen in the nosocomial vs community-acquired groups for:
    • Oxygen requirements (43% vs 47%); 
    • Intensive care admission (13% vs 11%); 
    • Need for mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%); and
    • Length of hospital stay (median, 9.5 vs 8.5 days).

Limitations

  • Observational design.