Obesity linked to LUTS

  • Lai HH & al.
  • Urology
  • 27 Oct 2018

  • curated by Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Obesity is a key metabolic factor linked to urinary incontinence (UI) in both men and women, and to overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) in women.

Why this matters

  • "Recent studies suggest that metabolic factors may play a role in the development of [OAB], [UI], and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)," say researchers.

Study design

  • Researchers studied adult patients seeking LUTS treatment (N=920), assessing urinary symptoms and metabolic factors.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • Central obesity (per each 10-cm increment in waist size) was associated with (ORs):
    • UI in both sexes: 1.16 (P=.008);
    • stress UI (SUI) in women: 1.27 (P=.008);
    • urgent UI (UUI) in both sexes: 1.24 (P=0.001); and
    • OAB in women: 1.248 (P=.003).
  • General obesity (per each 5-unit increase in BMI) was associated with:
    • UI in both sexes: 1.443 (P=.028);
    • SUI in women: 1.931 (P=.023);
    • UUI in both sexes: 1.857 (P=.001);
    • OAB in women: 2.432 (P<.001>
  • Dyslipidemia was associated with nocturia ≥2: OR, 1.547 (P=.010).

Limitations

  • Researchers did not measure fasting glucose, HbA1c, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglyceride levels to fully assess metabolic syndrome.

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