Obstetric and neonatal outcomes with COVID-19


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
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Obstetric and neonatal outcomes following COVID-19 infection are very good, according to a descriptive study reported in the Lancet Infectious Diseases.

The retrospective study of seven patients infected with COVID-19 in late pregnancy were admitted to hospital. All patients had a caesarean section at an average gestational period of 39 weeks, two days.

Two patients had chronic diseases (hypothyroidism and polycystic ovary syndrome).

The average incubation period was five days (range 2-9). All patients had normal leucocyte counts, five had neutrophilia, five had lymphopaenia, two had thrombocytopaenia and D-dimer was high in all. Two patients had liver function abnormality, with increased alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase, or both.

Computed tomography revealed six patients had bilateral pneumonia, one had unilateral pneumonia. All received oxygen therapy via nasal catheter and were treated with antivirals and antibiotics, and post-caesarian corticosteriods.

Pregnancy outcomes were good; none were admitted to intensive care. Neonatal birthweights were normal.

Only three infants who remained hospitalised for observation were tested for COVID-19, one tested positive 36 hours after birth and had mild shortness of breath, with mild pulmonary infection, and was discharged after two weeks. At 28 days postnatal follow-up there were no neonatal respiratory symptoms.

Long-term outcomes and potential mother-to-child vertical transmission need further study.