Obstructive sleep apnoea and elevated BP in children: is there a link?

  • J Am Soc Hypertens

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • In children referred for elevated BP, habitual snoring was common.
  • Risk for stage II hypertension was high in children with severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).

Why this matters

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends polysomnography for all children with habitual snoring and symptoms/signs of OSA.
  • Identifying children with OSA may help in lowering the cardiovascular risk in children with elevated BP.

Study design

  • Retrospective review of 446 patients (habitual snoring, n=104; no habitual snoring, n=342) with elevated BP.
  • Patients were assessed for the presence of habitual snoring, learning disability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and mood problems during the initial visit to the hypertension clinic.
  • Funding: Strong Children’s Research Center.

Key results

  • 23% of patients had habitual snoring and it was more common in those who were obese (P<.001>
  • Overall, 74 patients had polysomnography, of which 17 had primary snoring (no OSA) and 57 had OSA (mild OSA, n=18; moderate OSA, n=18; severe OSA, n=21).
  • After adjustments, patients with severe OSA were associated with higher office systolic BP index (β, 0.07; P=.01).
  • Risk for stage II hypertension was significantly higher in patients with severe OSA (OR, 8.9; P=.004).

Limitations

  • Risk for bias.