Obstructive sleep apnoea: periodic limb movements during sleep tied to elevated systolic BP

  • Lombardi C & al.
  • Respirology
  • 24 Dec 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • In patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS), at least with a frequency of ≥25 events per hour, is associated with an increased systolic blood pressure (SBP).

Why this matters

  • Findings concerning the outcomes of the association between PLMS and OSA have shown inconsistent results regarding the sleepiness or cardiovascular complications.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional study included 1487 patients with OSA recruited in the European Sleep Apnoea Database (ESADA) study.
  • All patients were divided into 2 groups:
    • patients with significant PLMS (frequency of ≥25 events per hour; group 1; n=132) and
    • patients without significant PLMS Index (PLMSI frequency of
  • Funding: European Union COST Action B26 and others.

Key results

  • In the univariate analysis, SBP was significantly higher in patients with OSA and significant PLMS vs those without significant PLMSI (135.7, mean standard deviation [SD]17.70] mmHg vs 130.90, SD 14.64] mmHg: P<.001>
  • After adjustment for confounders, increase in SBP (+2.64 mmHg; P=.044) remained significant in patients with OSA and significant PLMS vs those without significant PLMSI.
  • No significant increment was observed in diastolic BP (0.99 mmHg; P=.310) and pulse pressure (1.64 mmHg; P=.119) between patients with OSA and significant PLMS vs those without significant PLMSI.

Limitations

  • Study did not evaluate causal link between PLMS and BP elevation.
  • Risk of bias.