Over 34,000 10-24-year-olds hospitalised for self-poisoning in England

  • Public Health England

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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In 2017/2018, there were 34,271 hospital admissions in England as a result of self-poisoning in children and young people aged 10-24 years, according to data released by Public Health England (PHE).

The data show that the number of admissions in 2017/2018 was higher than in 2016/2017 when there were almost 34,000 admissions. The new figures include 610 cases in children between 10 and 12 years, of whom 19 were just 10 years old.

In all age groups, the number of cases was significantly higher in girls than in boys. In 2017/2018, girls were three times more likely to be hospitalised as a result of intentional poisoning (n=26,293) than boys (n=7978).

Numbers were higher for girls aged 14-19 years, with the highest number recorded in those aged 15 years (n=3279), although this is the lowest number among girls in this age group since 2013/2014. Among boys aged 15 years, there were 582 hospitalisations for intentional poisoning in 2017/2018. This continues a trend of steady increase among boys in this age group since 2014/2015.

In boys, most cases were documented in 19-24-year-olds. The highest number was seen in those aged 21 years (n=862). However, the figures do show a slight but encouraging decrease in hospital admissions among young men in their early 20s. In 2013/2014, there were 5373 cases in males aged 20-24 years inclusive. In 2017/2018, this had reduced to 4005.

Additional data are available here.

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