Preeclampsia and risk of CKD in later life: new research


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study have prompted calls for certain women with preeclampsia to receive coordinated nephrological care postpartum so that any renal disease can be identified and treated quickly.

The research, presented at the European Renal Association – European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Congress in Copenhagen this week, found preeclampsia could be linked with renal disease in later life.

The study included 1,072,330 women in Denmark with pregnancies lasting at least 20 weeks, followed for 19,994,470 person-years (average: 18.6 years/woman). During follow-up, 3,901 women developed chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Compared with women without a history of preeclampsia who had delivered in the same gestational age interval, women with a history of preeclampsia had significantly higher rates of postpartum CKD, especially, if they had suffered from early preterm preeclampsia. The earlier preeclampsia occurred in the pregnancy, the higher was the risk.

The authors noted associations for glomerular diseases years after delivery were especially striking, but associations for unspecified chronic kidney impairment and hypertensive kidney disease were also strong. In contrast, associations with hypertensive kidney disease and chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis were more constant over time.

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