Racial disparities persist in early-stage NSCLC

  • Clin Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • African Americans (AAs) and American Indians (AIs) were significantly less likely to undergo surgery for early-stage NSCLC than Caucasians (Cs) and Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs), and had significantly lower 2-year OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS).

Why this matters

  • Despite efforts to reduce healthcare disparities among patients with NSCLC, racial disparities persist.

Study design

  • 62,213 patients diagnosed with stage I NSCLC from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • AA and AI patients were significantly less likely to receive surgery than C and API patients (56% and 58% vs 67% and 72%, respectively; P<.0001>
  • AA patients were more likely to forgo local treatment than C patients (18% vs 11%; P<.0001>
  • Compared with C and API patients, AA and AI patients had significantly lower 2-year OS (70% for C, 65% for AA, 60% for AI, and 76% for API; P<.0001 and css for c aa ai api p>
  • After multivariable analysis, AI patients had the worst OS (aHR, 1.33; P=.0194), and API patients had the best (aHR, 0.80; P<.0001 but os between aa and c patients was not significantly different.>

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit