Remote blood pressure monitoring app may be beneficial


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Researchers are reporting promising findings from a new study which investigated the effectiveness of a remote blood pressure (BP) monitoring application (app) to reduce blood pressure. The study included 276 individuals with diabetes and self-reported hypertension who received a Bluetooth-connected BP monitoring device, education about hypertension management and access to health coaches. At baseline, 63 per cent (n=173) had uncontrolled hypertension (BP >130/80 mmHg). 

The study found that after six weeks of home BP monitoring on the programme, BP decreased by 11.2/5.18 mmHg (P=.004). In multivariable modelling, participants who had the highest blood pressure at baseline were most likely to see reductions in both systolic and diastolic pressure by the end of the study

“The results of the pilot study provide initial data that a holistic programme - bringing together remote blood pressure monitoring with patient education and health coaching - can have a significant beneficial effect on blood pressure levels,” said Dr Bimal R. Shah, assistant consulting professor at Duke University School of Medicine and chief medical officer of health technology company Livongo, who developed the app. 

The research will be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session this weekend.