Review supports botox as treatment for chronic migraine


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new analysis, which investigated the effect of botulinum toxin type A in reducing the frequency of migraine headaches, has found that not only is it superior to placebo for reducing migraine, but also for the first time, has shown that it may also lead to improvements in quality of life. 

Researchers analysed data from 17 studies including a total of 3,646 patients that compared patients receiving botulinum toxin versus placebo injections into head and neck muscles as a preventive treatment for migraine. 

They identified a significant reduction in the frequency of chronic migraines with botulinum toxin at three months, with a mean difference in change in migraine frequency per month of -1.56 (95% CI -3.05 to -0.07; P=.04).  There was also a tendency toward a reduction in the frequency of episodic migraine. 

Secondary analysis also identified a significant reduction in the frequency of chronic migraines with botulinum toxin type A at two months. There was also a significant improvement in patients’ quality of life at month three in the botulinum toxin type A group (P<.00001>

Presenting the findings in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the authors concluded: “Botulinum toxin type A is a safe and well-tolerated treatment that should be offered to patients with migraine.” 

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