Selenium-rich diet tied to protection against osteoporosis

  • Wang Y & al.
  • BMC Musculoskelet Disord
  • 4 Dec 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Higher dietary selenium is associated with a lower prevalence of osteoporosis (OP) in a cross-sectional cohort of middle-aged and older Chinese participants.

Why this matters

  • Clinicians may consider recommending a selenium-rich diet consisting of meat, fish, eggs, bread, cereals, and milk to protect against development or progression of OP (fruits and vegetables contain limited selenium).

Study design

  • A cross-sectional cohort of middle-aged and older Chinese participants (N=6267) who received a health screening.
  • Dietary selenium (in quartiles) was based on responses to the validated Semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire for 63 food items, which was administered twice to all participants.
  • Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China; others.

Key results

  • Mean age, 52.2±7.4 years; OP prevalence was 9.6% (2.3% in men and 19.7% in women).
  • Higher levels of selenium in diet (vs lowest quartile) were associated with dose-related lower odds of OP after adjusting for energy intake, age, sex, and BMI:
    • Second quartile: aOR, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.55-0.94).
    • Third quartile: aOR, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.51-1.01).
    • Fourth (highest) quartile: aOR, 0.47 (95% CI, 0.31-.73).
    • Dose-response trend: P=.001.

Limitations

  • Selenium not directly assayed.
  • Observational design.