Sleep-disordered breathing linked to biomarkers of Alzheimer disease

  • JAMA Neurol

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A French cohort study finds that sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) vs no SDB is associated with greater amyloid burden and 3 other biomarkers of Alzheimer disease (AD) in cognitively healthy older adults.

Why this matters

  • Results suggest that SDB should be aggressively screened and treated.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional cohort study of 127 participants (secondary analysis) of the Age-Well clinical trial in France.
  • Participants were cognitively healthy older adults who underwent a neuropsychological assessment, polysomnography, MRI, and PET.
  • Funding: European Union; Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale; others.

Key results

  • SDB vs no SDB was associated with the following AD biomarkers overlapping the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus:
    • Greater amyloid deposition (t117, 4.51; family-wise error-corrected P=.04; Cohen d, 0.83).
    • Greater gray matter volume (t119, 4.12; family-wise error-corrected P=.04; Cohen d, 0.75).
    • Greater perfusion (t116, 4.62; family-wise error-corrected P=.001; Cohen d, 0.86).
    • Greater glucose metabolism (t79, 4.63; family-wise error-corrected P=.001; Cohen d, 1.04).
  • SDB was not associated with cognition, self-reported cognitive and sleep difficulties, or excessive daytime sleepiness symptoms.

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional, observational design.