Sleep quantity, quality are linked to stroke risk

  • Neurology

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Having long nighttime sleep duration, taking long midday naps, and sleeping poorly predicted stroke risk among middle-aged and older adults.

Why this matters

  • Usefulness for identifying patients at elevated risk.
  • If a causative factor, poor sleep may be modifiable.

Key results

  • During mean 6.2-year follow-up, 4.9% cohort experienced stroke.
  • Relative to peers with intermediate sleep duration (from 7 hours/night to
  • Compared with peers taking midday naps of 1-30 minutes, participants napping >90 minutes had elevated stroke risk (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03-1.53).
  • Findings were similar for ischemic stroke alone.
  • Relative to peers with good sleep quality, participants with poor sleep quality had elevated risks for:
    • Total stroke (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.09-1.52),
    • Ischemic stroke (HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.05-1.55), and
    • Hemorrhagic stroke (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.07-2.29).

Study design

  • Chinese prospective cohort study: 31,750 retirees (mean age, 61.7 years) initially free of stroke, coronary heart disease, cancer.
  • Main outcome: incident stroke.
  • Funding: National Natural Scientific Foundation of China; National Key Research and Development Program of China.

Limitations

  • Sleep parameters self-reported, with limited questions.
  • Information on sleep disorders (e.g., snoring) not collected.
  • Unknown generalisability.