Snoring tied to excess risk for CKD

  • Lee C & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 5 Aug 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Habitual snoring is linked to an increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) among individuals with normal renal function.

Why this matters

  • Self-reported snoring may be useful as a screening tool to help stratify CKD risk.

Study design

  • Prospective, community-based study of 9062 individuals (mean age, 52.0±8.9 years; 48.2% male) with normal renal function in the Korean Ansung-Ansan cohort, followed from 2001 to 2014.
  • Incident CKD was defined as ≥2 consecutive estimated glomerular filtration rate measurements 2; mean at baseline, 93.8±13.0 mL/minute/1.73 m2.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Participants were categorized based on self-report as nonsnorer (38.5%), snoring
  • Metabolic syndrome was more common in ≥1 day/week and
  • 764 patients (8.4%) developed CKD over a mean follow-up of 8.9 years.
  • CKD incidence was highest with ≥1 day/week snoring (10.2%), followed by
  • In multivariate analysis, individuals who snored ≥1 day/week had a 23% higher risk for CKD than nonsnorers (HR, 1.23; P<.01>

Limitations

  • Snoring determined via questionnaire rather than sleep test.
  • Self-report confirmed in a subset of patients.
  • Observational design cannot prove causation.