Statin use may lower the risk of melanoma recurrence

  • von Schuckmann LA & al.
  • Br J Dermatol
  • 4 Mar 2020

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Statin use commenced before and continued after melanoma diagnosis may reduce the risk of disease recurrence.
  • This protective effect was more pronounced in male patients and those with ulcerated primary melanomas.

Why this matters

  • Findings warrant further evaluation of the potential role of statins in improving the prognosis of high-risk melanoma.

Study design

  • This prospective study included 700 patients with tumour stage T1b-T4 primary cutaneous melanoma (mean age 62 years, 59% male, 28% with ulcerated tumours) between 2010 and 2014.
  • Association between long-term statin use and melanoma recurrence was evaluated.
  • Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council.

Key results

  • 94 (13%) patients developed melanoma recurrence within 2 years of diagnosis.
  • Long-term statin users (n=204) vs non-users had a significantly lower risk of melanoma recurrence within 2 years of diagnosis, irrespective of statin subtype or potency (adjusted HR [aHR], 0.55; 95% CI, 0.32-0.97).
  • The risk of recurrence was significantly reduced in statin users with ulcerated tumours (HR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.05-0.52), but not in statin users with non-ulcerated tumours (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.46-1.81).
  • Similarly, male statin users vs non-users were at a significantly lower risk of recurrence (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19-0.79) but not women statin users vs non-users (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.29-2.27).

Limitations

  • Relatively short follow-up period.
  • Lack of dose-response relationship between statin use and melanoma recurrence.