Steatosis and fibrosis among young adults in the UK

  • Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • 15 Jan 2020

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new study highlights the prevalence of steatosis and fibrosis among young individuals in the UK. The figures indicate that one in five individuals had steatosis and one in 40 had fibrosis around the age of 24 years. Obesity was the key risk factor for steatosis, and the risk for fibrosis was pronounced in individuals with harmful drinking patterns and steatosis.

Researchers determined the prevalence of steatosis and fibrosis in young adults recruited through the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Transient elastography and controlled attenuation parameter scores were used for assessment of steatosis and fibrosis.

The findings reported suspected steatosis in 20.7 per cent (95% CI, 19.4-22.0%) of participants, with 10 per cent presenting with severe steatosis. Being overweight or obese had a significant positive association with steatosis after adjusting for excessive alcohol intake, social class and smoking (overweight body mass index [BMI]: OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 4.11-6.50; P<.0001 obese bmi: or ci p suspected fibrosis was reported in per cent of participants. the risk for significantly higher individuals with concurrent alcohol use disorder and steatosis after adjusting smoking social class.>

Writing in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, the authors concluded: "This study provides evidence that the obesity epidemic is affecting the future health of young adults in the UK, by increasing their risk of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and complications of metabolic syndrome."