These patient factors affect screening for breast cancer: meta-analysis

  • Grimley CE & al.
  • Br J Health Psychol
  • 26 Dec 2019

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Uptake of breast cancer screening is associated with having health insurance, greater perceived benefits, and motivation toward mammography, among other health factors, according to this meta-analysis of 65 European studies.

Why this matters

  • Given that two-thirds of breast cancers are self-detected, understanding what motivates patients to get screened is important.
  • Clinician understanding of health and health beliefs about screening can allow them to tap into factors that improve the likelihood that a patient will be screened.

Study design

  • A meta-analysis of 65 European studies after the search of 5 databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, and ASSIA).
  • Standard mean difference (d) calculated for effect size and interpreted according to Cohen.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Lower levels of screening attendance were associated (Cohen's d) with:
    • Never having had cervical screening: −0.72 (P<.001>
    • Higher perceived barriers to mammography: −0.40 (P<.001>
  • Higher levels of screening attendance were associated with (Cohen's d):
    • Having private health insurance: 0.49 (P<.001>
    • Greater perceived benefits: 0.31 (P<.001>
    • Motivation toward mammography: 0.36 (P=.003).
    • Higher perceived seriousness: 0.24 (P=.019).
    • Greater perceived susceptibility toward breast cancer: 0.20 (P=.024).
  • Longer time to presentation was associated with presenting with a nonlump symptom: d, 0.32 (P<.001>

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity across studies.