Timing improves PVR for evaluating bladder outlet obstruction

  • Uzun H & al.
  • Urol J
  • 18 Mar 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Postvoiding residual urine volume (PVR) measurements taken at first desire to void correlate with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and are better for evaluating patients with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO).

Why this matters

  • PVR is often measured after patients drink lots of fluid and have a strong desire to void, which does not reflect routine voiding activity.

Study design

  • Researchers studied men with BOO who underwent transabdominal ultrasound to measure PVR and urine flow rate (N=60; mean age, 69.7±8.6 years), and then analyzed the relationship between these parameters and LUTS.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • PVR at first desire to void was significantly lower than PVR at strong desire to void:
    • 80.79±72.18 vs 158.35±115.82 (mean±SD), respectively (P<.001>
    • Correlated with LUTS (Spearman’s correlation coefficient [rs]=0.38; P=.012).
  • Conversely, urinary flow rate parameters at strong desire to void (mean±SD: Qmax, 13.53±6.32; Qave, 5.32±2.31) correlated with LUTS (rs=−0.492; P=.001).

Limitations

  • The study was single center and did not follow patients to determine response to therapy.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit