Visceral, thigh fat tied to aggressive prostate cancer

  • Dickerman BA & al.
  • Cancer
  • 10 Jun 2019

  • curated by Deepa Koli
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Specific fat depots, BMI, and waist circumference are associated with risk for advanced/fatal prostate cancer.

Why this matters

  • Findings highlight the need for lifestyle interventions that target fat loss and promote optimal prostate cancer outcomes.

Study design

  • 1832 men from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility–Reykjavik (AGES-Reykjavik) study who underwent CT imaging for the assessment of fat deposition.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • 172 participants were diagnosed with prostate cancer during follow-up (median, 10.1 years).
  • 31 prostate cancer-specific deaths reported during a median follow-up of 10.4 years.
  • Visceral fat and thigh subcutaneous fat were associated with risk for advanced and fatal prostate cancer, respectively (aHRper 1-standard deviation [SD] increase, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.00-1.72] and 1.37 [95% CI, 1.00-1.88], respectively).
  • Higher BMI was associated with significant risk for advanced disease (aHRper 5 kg/m2 increase, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.27).
  • Higher waist circumference was associated with increased risk for advanced (aHRper 1-SD increase, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.04-1.89) and fatal prostate cancer (aHRper 1-SD increase, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.01-2.07).
  • In men with a BMI 2, abdominal visceral fat was associated with risk for advanced and fatal prostate cancer.

Limitations

  • Changes over time not captured.

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