VTE risk may rise with increased TV viewing | AHA


  • Conference reports - RSi Communications
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.
Takeaway
  • Risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) may rise with increased TV viewing.
Why this matters
  • This is the first study in a western population regarding the effect of TV viewing on VTE risk in the legs, arms, pelvis, and lungs.
Study design
  • 15,158 middle-aged (45-64 y) participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study were assessed by researchers at the University of Vermont.
Key results
  • Risk of developing a VTE for the first time was 1.7 times higher in those who reported they watch TV “very often” compared with those who watch TV “never or seldom.”
  • Risk was 1.8 times higher in participants who met recommended guidelines for physical activity and reported watching TV “very often,” compared with those who reported watching TV “never or seldom.”
  • Risk increased with more TV viewing both for life-threatening clots in the extremities and those in the lungs.
  • While obesity was more common in people who watched more TV, in the study only about 25% of the increased risk could be explained by the presence of obesity.