World Health Statistics 2018 published


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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While considerable progress is being made towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in some areas, new data from the World Health Organization (WHO) shows progress has halted in other areas, with the organisation warning that the gains already made could “easily be lost”.

The WHO published its World Health Statistics 2018 last week, which provide a snapshot of the state of the world’s health.

The report shows the probability of dying from diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and chronic lung disease between ages 30 and 70 decreased from 22 per cent in 2000 to 18 per cent in 2016. Some 303,000 women died due to complications of pregnancy or childbirth in 2015, with data showing 40 per cent of all pregnant women globally were not receiving early antenatal care in 2013.

Under-five mortality rates improved, decreasing from 93 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 41 per 1,000 live births in 2016. However, every day in 2016, 15,000 children died before reaching their fifth birthday.

The report states that after unprecedented global gains in malaria control, progress has stalled. An estimated 216 million cases of malaria occurred in 2016, compared with 237 million cases in 2010 and 210 million cases in 2013. 

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